Posts Tagged ‘Formal methods’

When Formal Systems Kill

February 18, 2012

What happens when a philosophy professor (with a M.S. in Computer Science) and a formal methods engineer (like me) collaborate?  The outcome in my case is a paper entitled, “When Formal Systems Kill: Computer Ethics and Formal Methods” (pdf). In the paper, we give an ethical treatment of the use of formal methods. Our goal in the paper is not so much to make definitive claims on the subject but to raise awareness of the issue for further philosophical treatment. The subject has been neglected by ethics philosophers.

Darren (my coauthor) and I had a hard time deciding where to try to publish this. We ended up submitting it to the American Philosophical Association’s (APA) newsletter on Philosophy and Computers, where it was accepted for the Fall 2011 edition. (The APA is the “ACM of Philosophy” within the United States.)

The paper was a number of years in the making, being a side-project for me. I can’t say I agree with everything we wrote, but I hope it serves as a useful starting point for the dialogue between ethics and formal methods.

An Apologia for Formal Methods

March 14, 2010

In the January 2010 copy of IEEE Computer, David Parnas published an article, “Really Rethinking ‘Formal Methods’” (sorry, you’ll need an IEEE subscription or purchase the article to access it), with the following abstract:

We must question the assumptions underlying the well-known current formal software development methods to see why they have not been widely adopted and what should be changed.

I found some of the opinions therein to be antiquated, so I wrote a letter to the editor (free content!), which appears in the March 2010 edition.  IEEE also published a response from David Parnas, which you can also access at the letter link above.

I’ll refrain from visiting this debate here, but please have a look at the letters, enjoy the controversy, and do not hesitate to leave a comment!


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